Orthodontics for Kids | orthodontist Fremont ca

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The American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) suggests that your child be tested by a 7-year-old orthodontist. Therefore, the developmental milestone would be the complete eruption of the first four adult molars. They erupt behind the baby’s teeth (primary second molars) and NO teeth are damaged in the dental arches because of their growth and eruption. Early detection of any orthodontic problems is important in order to take early corrective action and avoid more difficult treatment later.

At Kids Smiles we know, a happy smile always needs more. For some kids, orthodontics is a significant step towards a healthy smile lifetime. Kids Smiles has partnered with Dr. Meenu Giri Orthodontics to ensure the highest quality pediatric dental care in the region of Fremont Bay. Dr Meenu Giri Orthodontics is the combined practice of DR. Meenu Giri, Family Dentistry,and her team for the best  Invisalign providers in the world.

At age 7, your child has enough permanent teeth to assess whether or not a problem is emerging. Like most life problems, if they are found early, orthodontic problems can be easier to correct. Understanding that early detection of orthodontic issues does not necessarily require intervention is vital for parents, but if early treatment is needed, our combined teams may be able to achieve outcomes that may not be as easy when your child’s face and jaws have grown.

To mention only a few oral disorders, orthodontic surgery will correct protruding teeth, crossbites, crowding, tooth spacing, jaw alignment, and airway deficiencies. In some cases, our orthodontic consultants will use orthodontic devices such as palatal expanders to extend the upper jaw to create more space for the adult teeth to complete the eruption.

The Kids Smiles team and Dr. Meenu Giri Orthodontic team are both working to provide each child with a tailor-made experience in an atmosphere specially designed for kids and early teens. We treat your children with respect and in appropriate, child-friendly terms clarify every step of their dental care.

Request an appointment with Kids Smiles by using our online form. If you also want to inquire about orthodontics, please mention that in the comment section of the form.

Dental Crown – Dentists in Fremont, CA

Sometimes in life, you just need a do-over. That’s exactly what crowns are — a new beginning for your tooth.

Teeth are your life’s important players! Not only are they the first responders for your digestive tract, they can also make a great first impression –so you deserve a stunning, fully functional package. If your teeth need a serious makeover, the only thing you want might be a crown.

A crown is a custom shell that fits your natural tooth perfectly. Crowns look like your original tooth and act exactly like it – except better. Crowns repair teeth that are missing or badly decayed or discolored. Crowns also superimpose dental implants and build bridges for dentists.

Fremont dentist, Dr. Meenu Giri shares what you need to know about getting a crown.

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If You Need A Crown

This usually takes two visits to the dentist to get a crown. The dentist makes a plan for your particular needs on the first visit and cleans the tooth. You will also get impressions of the tooth so that the real tooth can be properly matched with a crown. Your crown will be mounted and cemented on the second trip. A crown is a dental piece that is permanent or “fixed. This makes it very stable and durable.

In some cases, a crown can be designed, fabricated and placed in a single appointment with the help of advanced same-day technology.

Crowns can be made from a variety of materials and the advantages and disadvantages of each form. When choosing between porcelain, resin, or metal crowns, talk to your dentist.

Benefits of Dental Crowns

Crowns in both form and function are a superior dental restorative care. Because they are made differently, the dentist will give that tooth special attention to make sure it looks like a real tooth.

Form: Crowns look completely natural and are made of materials that match your teeth, they do not stain, and they fill in your smile for a beautiful set of pearly whites!

Function: Crowns are securely locked in place, shielding your tooth from damage and decay below, and are secure, fitting in your mouth completely naturally. When properly cared for, they can last for a decade or longer.

Getting & Maintaining a Crown

The same way you do all your other teeth, you can (and should) care for a crown. This includes twice-daily brushing, flossing once a day, and regular visits to your dentist. You should also strive to be careful with your teeth in order to preserve your crown and prevent the need for another down the road. It ensures that your teeth are not grinding or opening containers and bottles with them.

It might take a while to get used to the feel of your newly crowned tooth, but after a little time, it will feel completely comfortable and natural, even much better than it did before!

If you’re interested in a crown, Dr. Meenu Giri, Family Dentistry would love to take care of you. Contact us today for an appointment, and you’ll be on your way to a new smile in no time! The content of this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions. Dr Meenu Giri, Family Dentistry dentists are here to help. Find a family dentist near you online today to schedule an appointment.

How to Get Rid of Cavities

Dental cavities, or caries, are tiny gaps in the teeth’s hard surface. They are caused by bacteria that generate acid from sugar on the teeth’s surface. A bacterium known as Streptococcus mutans is the most common culprit.

The bacteria form a sticky film known as plaque. Plaque acids strip minerals from (demineralize) the enamel— a mostly calcium and phosphate layer of the teeth. This oxidation causes the enamel to have tiny holes. A cavity emerges once the acid damage extends to the dentin layer below the enamel.

Getting rid of cavities at home

Most home treatments were based on a 1930s Trusted Source report that indicated cavities were caused by the diet’s lack of vitamin D. In this research, there was a reduction in cavities among children who added vitamin D to their diets. Nevertheless, there were the best results for those who added vitamin D while also excluding grain products from their diets. This may be because the grains are able to stick to the lips.

Not getting enough vitamin D may make teeth more susceptible to cavities, but we now understand that this is only a part of the puzzle. Other risk factors for cavities include:

dry mouth or having a medical condition that reduces the amount of saliva in the mouth

eating foods that cling to teeth, like candy and sticky foods

frequent snacking on sugary foods or drinks, like soda, cereals, and ice cream

heartburn (due to acid)

inadequate cleaning of teeth

bedtime infant feeding

Once a cavity has penetrated the dentin, you won’t be able to get rid of it at home. The following home remedies might help prevent cavities or treat “pre-cavities” by remineralizing weakened areas of your enamel before a cavity develops:

1. Sugar-free gum

Chewing sugar-free gum after meals was shown to help remineralize enamel in clinical trials. Xylitol-containing gum has been thoroughly investigated for its ability to promote saliva production, increase plaque pH, and decrease S. Mutans, but it takes long-term studies.

A casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) compound has been shown to decrease S. Mutans even more than chewing gum that contains xylitol. This type of gum can be sold in supermarkets.

2. Vitamin D

Vitamin D is important in helping the food you eat to absorb calcium and phosphate. StudiesTrusted Source suggest an inverse relationship between eating foods high in vitamin D and calcium, such as yogurt, and young children’s cavities. Vitamin D from dairy products such as milk and yogurt can be extracted. Vitamin D can also be derived from the sun.

3. Brush with fluoride toothpaste

Fluoride plays a major role in cavity prevention and enamel remineralization. Extensive research Trusted Source has been done to show that cavities are avoided by regularly brushing your teeth with fluoride toothpaste.

4. Cut out sugary foods

This is the cavity cure no one enjoys talking to — stop eating so much sugar. The Trusted Source of the World Health Organization states that the most important risk factor for cavities is eating sugar. We suggest increasing the daily intake of sugar to less than 10% of your overall caloric intake.

When you’re eating sugar, try not to snack all day long on sugary foods. The enamel has an opportunity to remineralize once the sugar is gone. But if you eat sugar regularly, you don’t have the chance to remineralize the teeth.

5. Oil pulling

Oil pulling is an ancient practice involving swimming in your mouth for about 20 minutes around an oil like sesame or coconut, then spitting it out. Proof does not support claims that oil pulling “removes contaminants” from the skin.

Oil pulling is an ancient practice involving swimming around an oil, such as sesame or coconut, in your mouth for about 20 minutes, then spitting it out. Claims that oil pulling “removes contaminants” from the body. But a small, triple-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial showed that oil pulling with sesame oil reduces plaque, gingivitis, and the number of bacteria in the mouth just as effectively as chlorhexidine mouthwash.

6. Licorice root

Extracts from the Chinese licorice plant (Glycyrrhiza uralensis) can combat the bacteria responsible for dental cavities. Using licorice extract in a lollipop showed they were effective in significantly reducing S. mutans in the mouth and preventing cavities.

The bottom line

Vitamin D, oil pulling, licorice lollipops, chewing gum, and other home remedies won’t get rid of existing cavities on their own. But these methods may keep cavities from getting bigger and prevent new ones from coming. At best, they can help remineralize softened or weakened areas of your enamels before a cavity can develop.

The earlier a cavity is detected, the easier it will be for your dentist to repair it, so be sure to visit your dentist regularly.

The Importance Of Gum Health | Dentist In Fremont, CA

Let’s see those white pearls! You hear it all the time, but when did anybody want to see your full pink gums last time? While they may be destined to play their dark, show-stealing counterparts in second fiddle, gums are your mouth’s unsung hero. Gingiva (i.e., gums), together with the underlying bone, is the tissue that surrounds and protects the teeth. Gums are connected to the teeth, creating a bond that protects the underlying bone and creates an infection barrier.

Like most unsung heroes, until a problem arises, gums are usually given little thought. Sadly, the time has come for many of us. A research by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) indicates that almost half of Americans aged 30 and older have periodontitis (the advanced form of periodontal disease).

What is gum disease?

Gum disease begins when plaque builds up under and along the gum line, a sticky, bacteria-filled film. Plaque can cause gum disease and tooth decay infections, including gingivitis, the earliest stage of gum disease. The bad news is that the gums get inflamed, swollen, and susceptible to bleeding even at this early stage of gingivitis. The good news is that the damage is reversible since the bone and tissue holding the teeth in place are not affected. Gingivitis, however, could turn into parodontitis if left untreated. Parodontitis affects the bones that keep the teeth in place, unlike gingivitis. Parodontitis can ruin your teeth’s gums, bones and tissues without treatment.

Treatment

Not all infection of the gum requires surgery. In fact, professional dental cleaning already includes removing plaque and tartar from above and below the gum line (the primary cause of gum disease). Scaling and root planing are another non-surgical form of treatment. Scaling and root planing is another non-surgical form of treatment. This procedure is essentially a deep-cleaning under anesthesia where the hardened plaque and tartar are scraped away and any rough spots on the root of the tooth are smoothed to create a clean surface for the gums to be re-attached. It may also be recommended the use of antibiotics to control plaque and gum tissue inflammation.

In some cases, all that is required is non-surgical procedures; however, surgery is needed if the tissue around the teeth is damaged and can not be healed with non-surgical options. Providers may prescribe surgery to reduce flaps or pockets in these cases. During this procedure, the gums of a patient are lifted back in order to remove tartar and smooth the damaged bone. This results in a reduction of space between the gum and tooth, limiting the areas where bacteria can hide.

Most surgical techniques involve grafts of bone and soft tissue. Bone grafts use your own bone, synthetic bone, or donated bone fragments to replace and regenerate bone in areas destroyed by parodontal disease. This operation restores the stable connection of the teeth to the bone of a patient. Soft tissue grafts use grafted tissue, most commonly taken from the mouth’s roof, to reinforce thin gums or fill in areas where gums have fallen back.

Guided tissue regeneration may be a treatment option in cases where the bone has been destroyed. A small piece of mesh-like material is inserted between the bone and gum tissue, which is performed in conjunction with flap surgery. This prevents the gum tissue from growing into the area where the bone is supposed to be and allows the bone and connective tissue to grow back to better support the teeth.

Do I need to worry about gum disease?

Even if you have sterling, white teeth that are cavity-free, you are not immune to gum disease. Most people don’t even know anything is wrong because the early stages are usually painless.

While plaque is the primary cause of gum disease, other factors that can contribute to periodontal disease include:

Hormonal changes like those that happen during pregnancy, puberty, menopause, and menstruation make gums more responsive, making gingivitis easier to develop.

Illnesses can also affect the gums ‘ health. Recent studies have suggested a correlation between periodontal disease and several other diseases, including heart disease, diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis. Scientists believe that the link between these systemic diseases can be focused on inflammation.

Medications can also affect oral health because some lessen the flow of saliva, which has a protective effect on teeth and gums.

Smoking makes it harder for gum tissue to repair itself.

Family history of dental disease can also be a contributing factor in the development of gingivitis.

The good news is that gum disease is preventable and good oral hygiene habits play a big role. To help maintain healthy gums:

Floss regularly

Brush 2x a day

Get regular dental cleanings

Don’t smoke

Use fluoride toothpaste

Use a therapeutic mouthwash

You can also improve gum health by increasing your intake of the following foods:

Since they neutralize oral bacteria, onions are a great food for healthy gums. They have microbial properties that target the most common types of bacteria that cause cavities and gum disease.

Leafy greens are full of healthy vitamins and minerals, such as kale and spinach. This includes vitamin C, which increases red blood cell production and reduces inflammation. Both of these reinforce your fight against gum disease and irritation.

Celery, carrots, and apples (including naturally crunchy foods) are good for scraping meat and plaque stuck on. The hard pieces of these foods get into the crevices between the teeth and the tooth, which helps to keep your mouth fresh between the brushings. They also take longer to chew and generate more saliva, helping to flush the bacteria’s mouth near the line of the gum.

Dairy products such as milk, yogurt and cheese, are also great for teeth because they contain a protein called casein, which helps neutralize oral acids produced by bacteria in the mouth.

It’s important to remember that you don’t have to be born to suffer the debilitating consequences even if you have a family history of gum disease. You can maintain healthy gums through good oral hygiene, regular dental check-ups, and increased intake of the above-mentioned foods. Please contact our practice if you have any questions about your gums or are concerned about your oral health in general.

How to Detect the Early Signs of Cavities in Children

Cavities in children aren’t a big deal, right? Kids are losing those baby teeth, anyway, so what’s the point in looking for early signs of cavities?

Okay, there’s a big reason you should think about cavities in any and all of your teeth, according to your child’s dentist. It doesn’t matter whether or not those teeth were intended to fall out of the mouth of your baby.

Your oral health and the oral health of your child is directly related to your overall health. And ignoring the early signs of cavities, even in a baby tooth, means you’re ignoring a potential health problem later.

We’re sure that’s not a price your willing to pay. So, let’s get off that train and let Your Dr. Meenu Giri, Family Dentistry teach you some important info about cavities and your kids.

QUICK NAVIGATION

Tooth Cavities in Children

Causes of Cavities in Children

Early Signs of Cavities in Children

Preventing Cavities in Children

Take a Stand Against Cavities

Tooth Cavities in Children :

Cavities in children are common. As a matter of fact, the numbers are staggering.

The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIH) states that nearly 42 percent of children ages 2 to 11 have either full-blown cavities or tooth decay in their mouths.

That’s nearly half of all children.

And that doesn’t even include the millions of families who can’t afford to pay for dental care or choose not to bother.

That means nearly half of all children suffer a higher risk of life-threatening health problems in adulthood simply because they’re not receiving the oral health care they need.

Do not ignore those baby teeth

Yes, those teeth are falling out of your children’s mouths, but cavities aren’t just about rotten or unsightly teeth. That’s something many people forget.

Cavities can become dangerous.

As the decay becomes worse, it can spread to the gums. When that happens, it can also spread into the blood. That places your children at risk for more serious health issues. It also has the potential to cause problems years down the road.

So, please don’t ignore cavities. Those teeth are falling out, yes, but your child’s future health depends on having healthy teeth throughout their childhood.

Make an appointment for your child with Dr. Meenu Giri, Family Dentistry and start them off on the right track.

CAUSES OF CAVITIES IN CHILDREN

You may be wondering what causes cavities in children. Knowing the cause is the first step to the power against cavities.

After all, knowledge is power.

And it’s not just eating a sugary diet or not brushing correctly. It’s a culmination of many factors, and it would benefit you to know them all.

Bacteria and the early signs of cavities

The mouth contains a lot of bacteria. Some are good, and some are bad.

Good bacteria work to fight off the bad stuff and prevent illness as well as other unfortunate health conditions. But some of the bacteria in the mouth work to break down foods that contain starches and carbohydrates.

These foods then turn to acids that cause plaque. And when plaque is not removed from the teeth, it causes teeth to decay.

Lack of proper oral health care

If your children are not brushing and flossing their teeth properly, the plaque in their mouth has time to sit on the teeth and break down the enamel.

As it breaks down the enamel, it causes the teeth to rot. That’s what causes cavities.

You see, the plaque is an acid that eats the tooth a little at a time, and it’s not something you want to have on your teeth.

Lack of dental care

Here’s the thing about dental care: your children can brush correctly and floss regularly and still not remove all the plaque from their teeth.

Plaque is often found in very hard to reach areas of the mouth, and it requires special dental tools that can reach into those places to properly remove it. If your children are not seeing the dentist every six months for professional cleaning, they’re at risk for allowing their plaque to stick around longer and cause more damage.

Here’s the truth:

Your child’s dentist can find a cavity quickly, and they can stop it before it has time to turn into a more serious problem. Not only that, they can identify the early signs of cavities and hit the issue head-on.

That’s why you’re encouraged to see the dentist every six months, and the same rule applies to your children.

EARLY SIGNS OF CAVITIES IN CHILDREN

Early signs of cavities in children can help you prevent your children’s cavities from causing gum disease or affecting their oral health.

It’s important for you to remember that a cavity doesn’t mean your child will develop health issues. And it also doesn’t mean that they’re not doing their very best to brush and floss.

It might just mean your child produces high levels of the bacteria that causes cavities. It also might mean your children drink water without fluoride or they don’t have as much saliva in their mouths as other children do.

As we said, cavities don’t necessarily reflect yours or your children’s oral health care or habits. Cavities happen. And you can spot the early signs of cavities in children to stop them in their tracks.

A poor diet

This isn’t always an early sign of cavities as some children eat a poor diet and never experience cavities. However, cavities in children are more prevalent and more common when a child eats food rich in carbohydrates and starches.

Sugary foods, sugary drinks, and other items that are generally viewed as unhealthy are a sign your child is more likely to suffer from cavities as they age.

Lack of proper oral health care

While you might assume that white spots on teeth mean they’re just clean, that’s a misconception.

Spots that are whiter than the rest of the tooth indicate that the enamel on that area of the tooth has already begun to break down, which is bad news.

Sensitivity is one of the early signs of cavities

Are your kids complaining that their teeth are sensitive or that they hurt? It might happen when they are chewing a meal or when they are eating or drinking something cold or hot.

This could be one of the most common early signs of cavities in children you should look for. It can mean their enamel is eroding.

Look at the teeth — again

If you see any stains that are black or brown, it’s a sign that a cavity has already set into the tooth. This is the moment you call the dentist and don’t make another excuse to miss an appointment.

A cavity may have already formed, and you must have it treated right away to prevent it from becoming deeper and affecting your child’s gums.

Pain in the mouth

If your child is in pain, call the dentist. Period.

It might be one of the most telling early signs of cavities in children, but it might also be another oral health issue. Any time your child’s mouth hurts or they are in pain; it’s a sign that the dentist needs to take a look.

It’s one of the early signs of cavities you can’t be too careful about.

PREVENTING CAVITIES IN CHILDREN

Prevention is the key to keeping your child’s mouth healthy, which is why it’s essential to take note of the things you can do to help your child prevent cavities.

Remember that even the most conscious and careful parents and children cannot prevent cavities in certain instances. It’s not a reflection on your oral health care abilities.

Brush with fluoride toothpaste after meals and beverages

Reduce the number of carbs and starches your children consume

Rinse the mouth after all meals

Drink water instead of anything else

Brush for two minutes each time

Floss daily

See the dentist for regular appointments

Your dentist can discuss other preventative measures with you as well. Some of these include dental sealants, fluoride treatments, and even a list of foods you can eat. These will consist of fo​​ods that aren’t as likely to cause issues in your mouth.

Here are a few to add to yours and your kid’s diet:

Calcium

Fruits high in fiber

Whole grains

And remind them to rinse after they’re done eating, no matter what.

Here’s the good news:

You and your children can all benefit from this information, and you can thank your dentist when you have healthy teeth.

Get the kids involved

Not only should you teach your children good oral care, but you also need to show them the early signs of cavities.

Empower them!

No one sees your kid’s teeth more than they do, and by teaching them what to look for, you’re giving them tools they can use for the rest of their lives.

Giving them responsibility for their own health will only help them.

Have you seen the early signs of cavities in your kids? The staff at Dr. Meenu Giri, Family Dentistry is here to help. Tell us about your experiences in the comments!

October is National Dental Hygiene Month | Dentist in Fremont

Happy October, all of you! It’s one of the year’s spookiest seasons, and one of the most appalling things we can think of is having problems with our teeth and gums. Because October is the National Dental Hygiene Month, by recognizing the importance of your daily hygiene activities, we want to promote a healthy mouth for everyone. A healthy, beautiful smile is built on good teeth and gums!

Plaque

The mouth is full of living bacteria, some of which feed on carbohydrates and sugar drinks and survive on them. To build a sticky bacterial film (plaque), these can release acids mixed with saliva and food particles. When plaque builds up, it damages and weakens the enamel of the tooth, causing decay and cavities through the softer dentin and tooth pulp below it.

Teeth with significant decay also require treatment with the root canal to save the tooth from the serious root-taking infection. A root canal eliminates bad bacteria and dead tissue that may otherwise cause the tooth to be extracted.

Signs You Might Need a Root Canal

– Tooth pain or pain when chewing

– Sensitivity to hot and cold food and drinks

– Sensitive gums

– Gum infection

– Darkened or chipped teeth

– Swollen lymph nodes

– Oral trauma

What You Can Do

Did you know that China invented the first known bristle toothbrush in 1948? The original toothbrush used boar hairs attached to bamboo or bone handles, unlike the smooth nylon-bristled brushes we use today. We don’t know about you, but we appreciate the toothbrushes of today!

You’ll want to begin by shielding your mouth from plaque to avoid damaged teeth. Drinks such as soda, fruit juices, sports drinks, carbonated water, and other acidic or sweetened foods, for example, are almost a lifeline for oral bacteria that bind your teeth. Restrict these drinks to minimize plaque, and when you drink them, use a straw to reduce tooth enamel contact. Tea, milk, low-sugar vegetable juice, and unsweetened black and green tea are the best choices.

This year’s National Dental Hygiene Awareness Month focuses on four habits you need to practice daily:

Brush

Brush your teeth with a soft-bristled toothbrush (no boars hair!) twice a day for two minutes every session. You want to wash them gently without damaging the tissues of the enamel or soft gum. Make sure the head and form of the brush fit securely in your mouth so that bacteria and food particles can be extracted from the back areas. Hold your brush in your gums at an angle of 45 degrees. Use quick strokes, move the toothbrush back and forth to wash all tooth surfaces where the food is chewed–outside, inside and top of the molars. Make sure the grooves and crevices are polished. Clean the inside of your front teeth with up-and-down-strokes.

Floss

Clean your teeth once a day with a variety of flossing tool (one that makes you want to floss every day) to get rid of your toothbrush’s dental plaque. Plaque accumulation may cause it to harden into tartar or calculus to be removed using special tools by a dental hygienist.

Rinse

Through brushing or flossing alone, certain parts of the mouth can not get rid of plaque. Regular mouthwash rinsing kills bacteria to prevent tooth decay and gum disease (oral tissue infection) from taking control. A non-alcoholic antimicrobial rinse that is appropriate for your needs can be recommended by your dentist.

Chew

Talking of dry mouth, did you know that 20 minutes after you eat sugarless gum chewing reduces the chances of deterioration of the tooth? That’s because chewing encourages balanced saliva production by stimulating saliva glands. When rinsing off food particles and bacterial waste, the saliva plays a vital role and neutralizes the toxins from oral bacteria.

This month is a good time to toss out your old worn-out toothbrush and find a flossing method you will enjoy using every day. You’ll also want to thank your dental hygienist the next time you see them for all their efforts to make your smile the best it can be!

Tooth Brushing Mistakes You Make Every Day

You don’t clean at the right time of day

If only once a day you were to brush when would be the best time? Naturally, night time! The longest period of the day when you’re not eating when you’re sleeping, and therefore feeding the bacteria that cause decay of the tooth and gum disease. Another mistake I encounter as I speak to people every day is that many people brush up the morning before breakfast. It’s okay to freshen your morning breath, but remember to brush after eating. After all, before exercising in the gym, you wouldn’t have a shower and not after!

You use the wrong brush

Anything but a soft brush can harm not only the teeth, but also the gums. Plaque is smooth and easy to remove. Remember, not how hard you are brushing, it’s how deeply you are brushing. Use a smooth brush at all times.

You ignore the rest of your mouth

In the tiny crevices between the “papillae” on the back of the tongue, your tongue harbors food and bacteria. To get rid of these harmful bacteria, use a tongue scraper or your brush. (Your breath can also be improved!)

Not using proper technique

Believe it or not, I spent 2 years in dental practice before learning how to properly floss! Many people have never really learned how to properly brush either and many dental professionals are guilty of paying “lip service” for proper oral hygiene without showing their patients how to do it properly. If you have any doubts, always check with us. Never “scrub” and don’t apply too much pressure.

Not brushing long enough

The American Dental Association recommends for 2 minutes each time brushing twice a day. If you watch the clock, two minutes is a long time! That’s one reason I’m a fan of electric toothbrushes is because they’re running 2 minutes on a timer so you don’t have to think about it.

You don’t replace your brush

If the bristles get worn, you should probably replace your brush every 3-4 months, more often. Worn bristles will not remove plaque and bacteria effectively. And don’t forget to immediately replace your brush if you were sick! In the bristles, bacteria and viruses from a disease can reside and potentially re-infect you.